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Inspirational Quotes for the WEEKEND

By Dr Charles Leyman Kachitsa

As human beings given mandate to rule this world, we are constantly making choices in all aspects of nature. It is the choices that we make that lead to how individually our life spans out on a daily basis as well as long term in the future. The art of choice should never be taken for granted to all with progress mindset, it should never be relegated to the back stage of living fruitfully, but regularly be revisited to make sure the skills we have in this avenue are sharp.

Some person decided or made a choice to eat a bat sometime in 2019 if the records have to be declared accurate. The result of this choice by one individual was unprecedented, it lead to what this generation had never imagined or anticipated could happen, the whole world locked away for months, taking almost two years.

The authority decided quickly to act after the dangers and losses of life arising from the choice of this one man who decided to eat a bat, well it might have been a group of men and women. For the one and or the group of people who decided to eat a bat, it is not clear whether such was a habit. Interestingly, their names have not been revealed up to now.

It was during the Covid19 lockdown period that people had to decide what to do with their spare time since they were restricted to being the four walls of their home. This is where the innate creativity of man and woman came out, devising systems that made the situation appear a choice made well anticipated and planned not strange as we knew it was.

The quotes this week are extracted from an olden book talking about how wealth is created at a national level. I am sure the selected quotations below from this book, will enlighten you to one or two life lessons, read and enjoy:

THE WEALTH OF NATIONS by Adam Smith

“In Smith’s view, the process by which we distinguish between objects of approval or disapproval involves a complex of abilities and propensities which include sympathy, imagination, reason, and reflection. To begin with, he stated, (following Hume) that man is possessed of a certain ‘fellow feeling’: —— How selfish so ever man may be supposed, there are evidently some principles in his nature which interest him in the fortune of others, and render their happiness necessary to him, though he derives nothing from it except the pleasure of seeing it.”

“This self deceit, this fatal weakness of mankind, is the source of half the disorders of human life. If we saw ourselves in the light in which others see us, or in which they would see us if they knew all, a reformation would generally be unavoidable.”

“The acquisition of valuable and extensive property, therefore, necessarily requires the establishment of civil government. Where there in no property, or at least none that exceeds the value of two or three days labour, civil government is not so necessary. —- He added: —– Civil government, so far as it is instituted for the security of property, is in reality instituted for the defence of the rich against the poor, or of those who have some property against those who have none at all.” 

“A man must live by his work, and his wages must at least be sufficient to maintain him. They must upon most occasions be somewhat more, otherwise it would be impossible for him to bring up a family, and the race of such workmen could not last beyond the first generation.”

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