Inspirational Quotes for the WEEKEND

By Charles Leyman Kachitsa

Could still be with us today, but we grew up in an era where you were not considered a ‘person’ until you attain a certain age, usually around 18 or 20 depending on your talents, skills and speed of growth.

The first sign of maturity to the ‘person’ was within you as there would start to be physical changes in your body such as in boys, a deep voice or and beads starting to appear, for girls noticeable deep personal grooming and the obvious tell-tell physical signs.

When that age came notable was also acceptability in sitting with the elders or older members of society, eating on the table with the elders. And also access to information which in the prior age band you could not have and in any case even if you had acquired by chance, you would be punished for. Whilst you would have marvelled at how decisions are made at all levels, when this age comes people start asking you to make some of those decisions either for yourself or for others.

The quotes for this week are those taken from the book that when you read in full, you will come to understand that the combination of belief and positive living can go a long way in wellness. I am sure the selected quotations from the book will enlighten you to one or two lessons, read and enjoy:

THE SCIENCE OF BEING WELL by Wallace D. Wattles

“The principle of Health is moved by Faith; nothing else can call it into action, and only faith can enable you to relate yourself to health, and sever your relation with disease, in your thoughts. ——— You will continue to think of disease unless you have faith in health. If you do not have faith you will doubt; if you doubt, you will fear, and if you fear, you will relate yourself in mind to that which you fear.”

“Man can live in three general ways; for the gratification of his body, for that of his intellect, or for that of his soul. The first is accomplished by satisfying the desires for food, drink and those other things which give enjoyable physical sensations. The second is accomplished by doing those things which cause pleasant mental sensations, such as gratifying the desire for knowledge or those for fine clothing , fame, power, and so on. The third is accomplished by giving way to the instincts of unselfish love and altruism. Man lives most wisely and completely when he functions most perfectly along all of these lines, without excess in any of them. The man who lives swinishly, for the body alone, is unwise and out of harmony with God; that man who lives solely for the cold enjoyment of the intellect, though he be absolutely moral, is unwise and out of harmony with God; and the man who lives wholly for the practice of altruism, and who throws himself away for others, is as unwise and as far from harmony with God as those who go to excess in other ways.”

“The current sciences of medicine and hygiene have made no progress toward answering the question, What shall I eat? The contests between the vegetarians and the meat eaters, the cooked food advocatyes, raw food advocates, and various other ‘schools’ of theorists, seem to be interminable; and from the mountains of evidence and argument piled up for and against each special theory, it is plain that if we depend on these scientists we shall never know what is natural food to man. Turning away from the whole controversy, then, we will ask the question of nature herself, and we shall find that she has not left us without an answer.”

“In the temperate zone the largest demands are made on man in spirit, mind, and body; and here we find the greatest variety of foods provided by nature. And it is really quite useless and superfluous to theorize on the question what the masses shall eat, for they have no choice; they must eat the foods which are staple products of the zone in which they live. It is impossible to supply all the people with a nut-and-fruit or raw food diet; and the fact that it is impossible is proof positive that these are not the foods intended by nature, for nature, being formed for the advancement of life, has not made the obtaining of the means of life an impossibility. So, I say, the question, What shall I eat? has been answered for you. Eat wheat, corn, rye, oats, barley, buckwheat; eat vegetables; eat meats, eat fruits, eat the things that are eaten by the masses of the people around the world, for in this matter the voice of the people is the voice of God. They have been led, generally, to the selection of certain foods; and they have been led, generally, to prepare these foods in generally similar ways; and you may depend on it that in general they have the right foods and are preparing them in the right way. In these matters the race has been under the guidance of God.”

The Great Intelligence, which is in all and through all, has in reality practically settled the question as to what we shall eat. In ordering the affairs of nature, it has decided that man’s food shall be according to the zone in which he lives. In the frigid regions of the far North, fuel foods are required. The development of brain is not large, nor is the life severe in its labor-tax on muscle; and so the Esquimaux live largely on the blubber and fat of aquatic animals. No other diet is possible to them; they could get fruits, nuts, or vegetables even if they were disposed to eat them; and they could not live on them in that climate if they could get them. So, notwithstanding the arguments of the vegetarians, the Esquimaux will continue to live on animal fats.”