Inspirational Quotes for the WEEKEND

By Charles Leyman Kachitsa

In most houses the living room (sitting room) is the most important space in the house. It is where family resolutions are made, where negotiations are pan out, where instructions are given and where rewards or punishment quite often will be melted.

For the imposition of punishments, if the implementation or imposing of a punishment moves from the living room to the bedroom, means the atrocity committed is so serious. At other times it may mean the sin committed is so shameful that it cannot be administered on the open area of the living room but in the confines of a bedroom where normally before start the door is closed or locked. This also relates to other serious discussions not fit to be tackled in the open.

In olden days most living rooms, what others call the sitting room or family room, were more feminine. Perhaps the reason being that most women were housewives, not working and therefore the home is where they stayed more. Such ‘feminine’ things like pieces of clothes (chair and furniture covers) bearing flower imprints or embroidery patterns were the most distinguished features to covering sofas, dinning tables and chairs including all other furniture and equipment.

The sitting room also depicted, I believe it’s still the case now, ones social status and wealth in society. Such measure on the social ladder would be supported by the types of sofa settee or couch, the other surrounding furniture, the equipment and tools around for instance TV sets and or the music playing gadget one has. The more sophisticated these are, the more depiction of wealth.

This week’s quotations are taken from the book we began to have an insight into last week. When read in full, the book has potential of transforming you into a much enlightened person in all aspects of your life. I am sure the extracted quotes below from the book will point to you one or two important lessons, read and enjoy:

THE SCIENCE OF BEING GREAT by Wallace D. Wattles

“Important as the matter of your point of view for the facts of social life is, it is of less moment than your viewpoint for your fellow men, for your acquaintances, friends, relatives, your immediate family, and, most of all, yourself. You must learn not to look upon the world as a lost and decaying thing but as a something perfect and glorious which is going on to a most beautiful completeness, and you must learn to see men and women not as lost and accursed thing, but as perfect beings advancing to become complete. There are no ‘bad’ or ‘evil’ people. An engine, which is on the rails pulling a heavy train, is perfect after its kind, and it is good. The power of steam, which drives it, is good. Let a broken rail throw the engine into the ditch, and it does not become bad or evil by being so displaced, it is a perfectly good engine, but off the truck.”

You are a thinking center in original substance, and the thoughts of original substance have creative power; whatever is formed in its thought and held as a thought-form must come into existence as a visible and so-called material form, and a thought-form held in thinking substance is a reality; it is a real thing, whether it has yet become visible to mortal eye or not. This is a fact that you should impress upon your understanding that a thought held in thinking substance is a real thing; a form, and has actual existence, although it is not visible to you. You internally take the form in which you think of yourself; and you surround yourself with the invisible forms of those things with which you associate in your thoughts.”

“The one way to develop a perception of truth in large things is to trust absolutely to your present perception of Truth in small things. Remember that you are seeking to develop this very power or faculty – the perception of truth; you are learning to read the thoughts of God. Nothing is great and nothing is small in the sight of Omnipotence; he holds the sun in its place, but he also notes a sparrow’s fall, and numbers the hairs of your head.”

“You have formed, perhaps, the habit of thinking of yourself as a common person, as one of a limited ability, or as being more or less of a failure. Whatever you habitually think yourself to be, that you are. you must form, now, a greater and better habit; you must form a conception of yourself as a being of limitless power, and habitually think that you are that being. It is the habitual, not the periodical thought that decides your destiny. It will avail you nothing to sit apart for a few moments several times a day to affirm that you are great, if during all the balance of the day, while you are about your regular vocation, you think of yourself as not great. No amount of praying or affirmation will make you great if you still habitually regard yourself as being small.”