Inspirational Quotes for the WEEKEND

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By Charles Leyman Kachitsa

In some cases the darkness when night descended would be like no any other. Imaginatively one would wonder whether perhaps the powers above had flicked a switch to increase darkness. That’s because comparatively other nights people would see each other’s mouth as they speak one to another but in this dark darkness one would not be sure as to where one is they are speaking to only trusting that the words would be clear enough therefore not needing any facial expression.

How does one judge the anger of the other one when it all is total darkness and the only clue of the speakers feel of unpleasantness is through judging from the tone of their voice. Having travelled the world I am aware that there are some cultures that when they speak you would think they are always angry only to wonder that some of this anger is accompanied by laughter. Yet some languages always sound sorrowful, at least to foreigners hearing it though the owners might see all joy in their language.

What is it with darkness that makes spirits too dampen. To some though the night is a welcome curtain to separate them from plying eyes wanting to make judgement on their trade for most talk about the darkness bring and or harbouring evil deeds. But there are exemptions for some jobs need attention for around the clock and therefore people are forced to be on whether it’s day time or night time for example medical personnel. Most wars are fought in pitch darkness for to surprise the enemy.

The quotes this week I have taken from a book which was written in my own vernacular language but with rich idiom. I am sure reading the quotations you will realise and appreciate the craft that the writer put in getting his message across without labouring to use a truckload of words. Read and enjoy:

THE DEJECTED BRIDE (MKWATIBWI WOKHUMUDWA) by P. P. Litete

“The day before was a month end. It was a pay day. The night of the day before, that’s of the month end day, on that pay day; we had spent the whole night dancing, drinking and enjoying with our life. It was a big joyous party as we were bidding farewell to one of our friend who was travelling far away where he was going to stay for many years. We wished him a good trip, but we stressed on the point that he should not overstay there where he was going.———— We dispersed the time the cockerel started ruffling their feathers and crowing as a warning to those still sleeping that the Saturday was now gone and that now a Sunday had come. Also warning all those used to doing unpleasant things in the night that daylight was now descending, and that the darkness that was protecting them was disappearing, that’s expelling any doubts that no matter how skilful a witch was he cannot bewitch daylight.”

The Chichewa version for the above from which it was derived read, ” Dzulo lake linali tsiku lakutha mwezi. Tsiku la malipiro. Usiku wa dzulo lakelo; tsiku lakutha mwezilo; tsiku la malipirolo; tinachezera kuvina, kumwa ndi kusangalalatsa miyoyo yathu. Lidali phwando lalikulu lotsazikirana naye mnzathu wina amene anali kupita pa ulendo wakutali komwe adzakhalako zaka zambiri. Tidamufunira ulendo wabwino, koma tidalimbikira kumuuza kuti asakatchone komwe anali kunkako. ————- Tidabalalika pa nthawi yomwe atambala adali kumenyetsa mapiko awo m’nthiti, nkumafuula kuwachenjeza ogona onse kuti tsiku Loweruka lija lidapita, ndipo Lamulungu lidafika. Kuwachenjezanso onse ochita zoopsa m’kati Mwa usiku kuti kunja kunali kuyera, ndipo mdima womwe unali kuwabisa uja unali kuchoka; kutsimikizanso kuti, mfiti angadzitame, sangathe kulodza kucha.”

“I was also remembering that those days in the past during summer times we used to leave our houses just after the sun was coming up (in modern times we could say when the sun was at 9 O’clock) going to the bush or shallow wetlands hunting mice and grasshoppers or big birds. In addition I remembered that while mice were running away because of being far away or the density of the bush, we used to light some fire secretly to avoid being found out by adults afraid they would beat us if they knew. They would have beaten us because in those days before the advent of lavatories people used to respect themselves by using the bush.”

The above is from; “Ndidali kukumbukiranso kuti m’masiku akalewo pa nthawi ya Chirimwe tinali kuchoka m’midzi dzuwa litakwera pang’ono (makono tinganene kuti dzuwa litafika pa 9 koloko) nkumapita ku tchire kapena ku madambo kukasaka mbewa ndi zitete kapena zinziri. Ndidakunbukiranso kuti pamene mbewa zinali kuthawa chifukwa chakutalika kapena kuphimba kwa tchire tinali kutentha tchirelo, koma tinali kuchita moti tisadziwike kwa akulu chifukwa choopa kumenyedwa. Chotimenyera chikanakhala choti pa masiku akalewo zimbudzi zinali zisanafale ndipo anthu anali kudziremekeza okha ku matchire.”